Information seeking plan

tekijä: Eeva Marjatta Koponen Viimeisin muutos tiistai 17. syyskuuta 2019, 15.06


Name and e-mail address of each group member:

 

Academic discipline or field of study:

Objectives
Choose 3 objectives for the group! Choose the ones that you think are especially important for you to learn while you work on the plan.

1. I can tell the difference between everyday information and academic information.
2. I can identify key concepts related to my topic and turn them into search terms.
3. I am able to combine search terms into search statements.
4. I am familiar with the publication culture in my academic field.
5. I know how to search for scholarly articles.
6. I know which databases are central in my academic field.
7. I can evaluate and refine search results.
8. I understand the concept of RefWorks (or other reference managing software).
9. I understand why using references is important and I am familiar with academic ethics.

 

Feelings
What kind of feelings and/or thoughts does this assignment bring out?

 

 

PART A

1. DEFINING THE TOPIC AND FINDING BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Information resources for different needs
Identify key concepts

Choose a scholarly topic of your interest
OR
Choose a focus research area of your academic field in JYU

 

 

What databases do you use to find background information on your topic? Name the databases (at least 2). Write down any essential concepts and terms you find for later use.

 

 

What kind of information do you need to narrow down your topic? Try to find a few sources that help you get an overview of the topic. What did you find?

 

 

What are the most interesting aspects of the topic? What do you wish to find out? Formulate your research question(s), for example one main question and two additional questions! Keep in mind the general form of research questions.

 

 

2. SEARCH TERMS AND SEARCH STATEMENTS

Search terms and search strategies

Create a mind map! Use pen and paper or a mind map tool, such as bubbl.us/. The goal is to divide your topic into smaller pieces. Put your topic in the middle. Around the topic, write down each different aspect of your topic. List related concepts and synonyms for each aspect.

1. Start the mind map with the basic concepts. Use dictionaries, for example MOT.

2. Find subject terms and add them to your mind map. Where did you find the subject terms? Name the resources, for example YSO and a thesaurus from a central database of your field. Help: Resources by Subject -pages.

Which tools/resources did you use?

 

 

Add your mind map here:

 

 

 

Search statements

Combine your search terms into at least two different search statements. Use operators, truncation and phrase marks. Keep your research question(s) in mind and combine the central aspects of the topic into a search statement.




3. RESEARCH METHODS AND DATA

Research methods and data

Where can you find information on research methods? Name 2–3 resources!

 

 

PART B

Name and e-mail address of each group member:



Academic discipline or field of study:



Your topic:

 

 

4. FINDING SOURCES

Publication culture on different disciplines

Which publication types are favored in your academic field? List 2–3 publication types starting with the most essential one (e.g. articles, books, conference papers).

 

 

Finding books
Finding scholarly journals and articles
Open science 

What databases do you use to find sources? Name 1–3 central databases for each of the publication types, again starting with the most essential one. Check the Resources by Subject -pages.

 

 

Seek information in one of the databases for your most essential publication type. Use the search statements you created earlier. What database did you use? Which search statement worked best?

 

 

How useful is the database for you? Why?

 

 

Choosing scholarly and reliable sources

Name 3–5 ways of evaluating sources: how can you identify scholarly and reliable sources?

 

 

5. REFINING SEARCH RESULTS

Refining search results

Using the same database, list strategies for refining your search results in case you get

a) irrelevant results:

b) too many results:

c) too few results:

 

 

6. CITING AND MANAGING REFERENCES

Academic ethics and copyright
Avoiding academic fraud
Citing and managing references

For a scholarly article, what information do you need to give in the bibliography (=list of references)? The name of the author etc.


 

Give an example of an article in the bibliography – write out the reference as you would if you were creating a list of references.

 

How are you going to manage your references? Why?


Objectives
Did you meet your goals? Give yourselves a grade 1–5 (1=Didn’t learn anything, 5= learned a lot)!

 

 

 

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